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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/11/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    ... and proceeded to do a "fluff & buff on it today, removed the safety transfer bar so it doesn't automatically engage, and modified the cocking cams so it stays open. Still a bit more to go - breaking the sharp edges on the chamber mouths, reducing the spring tension on the top snap, etc., but... ... I was sitting there thinking, "I've got a set of Baikal barrels here somewhere"... I bought a parts gun, sans receiver, many years ago, so I rummaged around and found the barrels. Dang... other than having a center lug, these look pretty much identical to the 20"ers that are on it... except for having a half extractor vs. the figure 8 extractor on the MP220. I removed the extractor and took a hacksaw & cut the lug off the back of the barrels, then a draw file to true things up. A couple hours of fitting, filing, & stoning, and now I've got a two barreled set - 20" and 28 5/8". I probably increased the value of this fine shotgun by at least tens of dollars.
  2. 1 point
    I watched this rifle on GB for a week or more and nobody else wanted it. I waited until the last 20 minutes to put in a bid. It said "I won!". But won what was as little unclear. The pictures and description clearly stated a numerous faults. I was sure I'd find more. But that's just pepper in my soup. The good: It's a "94". In 1903 Marlin started marking the model number as "94", dropping the 19. The serial number puts it after 1906. It's unclear when it was actually made because records were lost or not kept after 1906. Then WWI disrupted normal production. After the war, there is still no records. The 94 was produced in some number but not catalogued. All were apparently made from parts on hand. Most were in 25-20 and 32WCF with round barrels. I'm guessing between 1906 and when the converted over to make guns for the war. This one is in 38WCF and has a non-standard 26" octagon barrel. I've got several 25-20s and 32WCF in the early rifles but not a major bore size. The bore shows lots of rifling. The breach face and firing pin are if the later small diameter. What's there looks like it matches. Overall patina is lightly pitted but no deep pitting or signs of being sanded. No deep scratches or dents. The bad: The rifle has seen a lot of "improvised" repairs. Every screw is buggered. The hammer main spring is a cobbled affair of two springs. The magazine spring was likely original and rusted to point of crumbling. The lever plunger is missing. And the worst, the ejector is missing. The ugly: The buttstock is homemade and looks to be red oak. The buttplate is missing. The forend has been broken and glued and had a rasp taken to it. The hammer screw was homemade but at least the threads in the frame were not screwed up. I'll likely let luck and time decide how I proceed. I'd like to find an original buttstock, buttplate and forend, I'd go that way. If not, I will likely install new wood. I'm sure I can get it in good shooting condition. It needed me. If I hadn't rescued it, it would have likely been parted out. The total of the parts would likely be twice what I paid for the gun.
  3. 1 point
    The barrel is stamped Great Plains Rifle 54
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