Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum
Iron Biscuit SASS#108048

Rifle Dry firing

Recommended Posts

You can.   To limit the wear and tear on the extractor, remove part of the rim so the extractor can’t grab it.   Just be prepared to have to push it snap cap out with a cleaning rod.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have been using the same Palo Verde snap caps for eight years..  They are made so they do not turn in your chambers and extract.  As  mentioned earlier, use a cleaning rod to remove them.  I usually store my cleaning rod in the barrel if I do not remove it  at the end of my practice session.  Great product.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll cast another vote for the Palo Verde cap.  Has worked great for a number of years with no signs of wearing out.  His shotgun snap caps are awesome too. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Edward R S Canby, SASS#59971 said:

Palo Verde Gunworks sells snap caps for rifles.

yes....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hells Comin said:

Why ?

 

Why not? :angry:

 

 

:P

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why spend the $. Never used any and I imagine that few have practiced as much as I have. Although I do not dry fire the rifle much. At home I just stage it and practice picking it up from all positions. I find dry firing the rifle  can throw my timing off. Buy everyone is different and have their own option.

 

That's why Bull.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hells Comin said:

 At home I just stage it and practice picking it up from all positions. I find dry firing the rifle  can throw my timing off. 

 

 

 

YEP.   I feel the same.

 

..........Widder

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdy,

Just leave the snap cap in the rifle and take it to a match.

SO FUN.

Best

CR

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practice ?

We Dont Need No Stinking Practice ! :o

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Hells Comin said:

Why spend the $. Never used any and I imagine that few have practiced as much as I have. Although I do not dry fire the rifle much. At home I just stage it and practice picking it up from all positions. I find dry firing the rifle  can throw my timing off. Buy everyone is different and have their own option.

 

That's why Bull.

 

 

I was just pulling your leg. ;)  I totally understand where you're coming from.  I will say that I have dry fired my rifle quite a bit in the past trying to learn a new technique.  Now that I have it down somewhat I've cut back for the exact reason you mentioned, don't want to throw my timing off.  My current practice routine is what you said, picking it up faster.  But in addition to just picking it up I also practice getting the first shot off faster.  I have the snap cap in while doing that and I know I'm not putting undue stress on my firing pin.  Is it necessary?  Maybe not. But I think the couple $$$ I spent on the snap cap is worth the added peace of mind.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started using snap caps last year when I was learning to not wrap my thumb around the stock of the rifle. Very useful for that purpose. Now my thumb stays down on the side of the stock, and I'm shooting faster. I still shoot snap caps during the winter for practice and for something to do. I pick out 5 bushes outside my window and shoot at them in different sequences, just like the stages I've shot and sequences that I made up. Good practice technique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Widder, SASS #59054 said:

 

YEP.   I feel the same.

 

..........Widder

 

X3 but I do dry fire the first shot and then lay it down. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Widder, SASS #59054 said:

 

YEP.   I feel the same.

 

..........Widder

 

Just curious but why or how does it throw your timing off? Is it because you don't have the extra weight of the round in the carrier and resistance of the empty case being extracted? Just trying to understand what you mean.   Thanks. Roper 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Renegade Roper said:

Just curious but why or how does it throw your timing off? Is it because you don't have the extra weight of the round in the carrier and resistance of the empty case being extracted? Just trying to understand what you mean.   Thanks. Roper 

 

Yes but mainly the resistance/sound/feel of the rounds feeding from the mag tube and into the chamber.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Renegade Roper said:

Just curious but why or how does it throw your timing off? Is it because you don't have the extra weight of the round in the carrier and resistance of the empty case being extracted? Just trying to understand what you mean.   Thanks. Roper 

 

I can't speak for others, but for me it varies with each firearm.

With the rifle, its easy to function the lever and pull the trigger fast, BUT without the rifle actually firing and recoiling, 

I find myself working the rifle faster than what I can actually shoot it.

 

With pistols, it wasn't so bad because I wasn't worried about throwing out any live rounds.

BUT, I was working the actions faster than I could acquire proper target acquisition.

In dry fire practice, I could literally draw and 'function fire' my 2 pistols Gunfighter style

for 10 shots in less than 1.5 seconds.   Thats not a misprint.   My Cowboy World record run of the

draw and 10 shots is 1.81 seconds and when I tried to do that in an actual stage scenario, I was

getting too many misses.

 

With the SG, it didn't have as much of a negative effect, but dry fire ONLY would cause me

to get out of timing sequence with my SG.

I shoot a 97.     Dry firing 4 rounds or 6 rounds allowed me to dry function it REALLY FAST.

But when I tried to run it real fast using live ammo, the recoil effected me somewhat.

I started live fire practice ONLY last summer, and it helped me to successfully run 6 on 6

in less than 4 seconds  (roughly 3.7 to 3.9 range).

 

So from my experience, dry fire practice without a good percentage of live ammo practice, 

was messing me up with my timing coordination with my firearms, especially with the rifle.

 

This may not be the case with everyone, but I can only comment on my experiences.

 

..........Widder

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the beginning the kids and I use to dry fire stages in our unfinished  basement using targets painted on a block wall.  We would time each other tapping the timer after the last shot.  (Don't you dare do this during a  match.) We would dry fire our firearms separately to build speed.  We also found that we were ejecting unfired rounds during live fire.  A good friend showed us how to reduce the amount of unfired rounds by dry firing and live firing sweeps from two targets ten feet apart.  This helped all of us coordinate our lever and trigger back on track.  The Palo Verde dry fire rounds are a very inexpensive solution over the eight plus years we have owned them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Renegade Roper said:

Just curious but why or how does it throw your timing off? Is it because you don't have the extra weight of the round in the carrier and resistance of the empty case being extracted? Just trying to understand what you mean.   Thanks. Roper 

 

It doesn't necessarily CAUSE timing problems, but it doesn't show you if/when your timing is off.  When dry firing the rifle you can simply slam it open and closed as fast as your fingers will move with no regard to actual function of the action.  Then when you get to a match you realize you weren't ejecting spent rounds completely or maybe you were opening the lever too soon after pulling the trigger and thus ejecting live rounds.  These are VERY real problems you might develop during dry fire that you won't see until you start using live ammo. 

 

I don't say any of that to scare you away from dry firing your rifle. Dry fire is a very valuable practice tool.  But please realize that you also need to do some live fire practice to ensure your dry fire didn't cause you to develop any bad habits. 

 

Changing subjects slightly; the same concept applies to shotgun practice.  Some folks use full weight dummy shells to practice loading and shucking their shotguns.  They say they want the same feel as live shells to practice loading. I think this is a bad idea.  When loading the weight of the shells makes absolutely no difference.  But the weight of the shells makes a great deal of difference when shucking.  It's much easier to shuck heavy shells because the extra weight helps the shells fall out of the chambers. For this reason you may be developing bad habits that won't be recognized until you're in the middle of a match.  You need to practice shucking with the same weight you'll be shucking in a match.  That means empty.  And that's why I recommended Palo Verde's shotgun snap caps above.  They're high quality products that weigh about the same as regular empty shells.

Edited by Shooting Bull
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, Shooting Bull said:

 

But the weight of the shells makes a great deal of difference when shucking.  

 

And, if you use an automatic shucking shotgun, you'll put undue stress on the shucking mechanism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again everyone for things to know/think about/ try/ practice etc.    I have a lot to learn and am grateful for everyone  willing to help and share what they know.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Stump Water said:

 

And, if you use an automatic shucking shotgun, you'll put undue stress on the shucking mechanism.

 

Bah.  Those things are gimmicks that'll never catch on. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎23‎/‎2019 at 6:23 AM, Kirk James said:

I usually store my cleaning rod in the barrel if I do not remove it  at the end of my practice session.  Great product.

 

On ‎1‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 12:38 AM, Chili Ron said:

Howdy,

Just leave the snap cap in the rifle and take it to a match.

SO FUN.

Best

CR

 

 

Even more fun if you leave that cleaning rod in:P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.